What we do

Specialist Neurological Care

At PJ Care, we provide care for people with many different neurological conditions, including:                                                                               

Acquired Brain Injury
Complex care including tracheostomy, ventilation and low awareness state
Dementia
Dementia - Young Onset
Huntington’s Disease
Korsakoff Syndrome
Motor Neurone Disease
Multiple Sclerosis
Multiple Systems Atrophy
Muscular Dystrophy
Parkinson’s Disease
Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP)
Spinal Cord Injury
Stroke
Traumatic Brain Injury

 

A neurological condition is one that affects someone’s brain or nervous system. It can affect movement, communication, behaviour and mental health.

Anyone can develop a neurological condition at any time. Some are present from birth; others such as Multiple Sclerosis, Motor Neurone Disease and Parkinson’s Disease can develop at any stage in life.

The specific causes of neurological problems vary, but can include genetic disorders, congenital abnormalities or disorders, infections, lifestyle or environmental health problems including malnutrition, and brain injury, spinal cord injury or nerve injury.

Many neurological conditions are life changing because they cause long term disability and severely affect people’s ability to live independently. Some conditions can improve over time with the right care and rehabilitation. Unfortunately, this does not apply to all conditions and some may require management of their condition and symptoms for the rest of their lives.

We have four care models, including care pathways led by specialist consultants. In partnership with residents, families, our highly skilled multi-disciplinary team and NHS professionals we can meet even the most complex needs.

 

Acquired Brain Injury

Acquired Brain Injury is brain damage caused by events after birth such as a fall or stroke rather than as part of a genetic or congenital disorder.

The physical, behavioural, or mental changes that may result from brain injury depend on the areas of the brain that are injured.

Please find a link below that will offer you further information and support

https://www.headway.org.uk/about-brain-injury/ 

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

 

Complex care including tracheostomy, ventilation and low awareness state

Residents receiving complex care have substantial and on-going healthcare needs. These can be the result of chronic illness, disabilities or following hospital treatment. This can include invasive or non-invasive artificial ventilation, tracheostomies or require a highly complex care and medication regime.

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

 

Dementia

Dementia is a term used to describe a range of progressive neurological disorders that affect the brain. There are many different types of dementia - and Alzheimer’s Disease being the most common. Some people may have a combination of types of dementia., and each person will experience their dementia in their own unique way.

- Alzheimer's disease

- Vascular dementia

- Dementia from Parkinson's disease and similar disorders

- Dementia with Lewy bodies

- Frontotemporal dementia (Pick's disease)

- Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)

Please find a link below that will offer you further information and support

https://www.dementiauk.org/understanding-dementia/about-dementia/

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

 

Dementia - Young Onset

Dementia is referred to as ‘young onset’ when it affects people under 65 years of age. It is also referred to as ‘early onset’ or ‘working age’ dementia. 

Dementia is a degeneration of the brain that causes a progressive decline in people’s ability to think, reason, communicate and remember. Their personality, behaviour and mood can also be affected. Everyone's experience of dementia is unique and the progression of the condition varies. Some symptoms are more likely to occur with certain types of dementia.

Please find a link below that will offer you further information and support

https://www.youngdementiauk.org/about-young-onset-dementia-0

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

 

Huntington's Disease

Huntington’s Disease (HD) is a progressive, hereditary neurological disorder which used to be known as Huntington's Chorea.

Symptoms are wide-ranging and usually begin in middle adulthood, but can occur at any age.

HD is caused by a faulty gene on chromosome 4, which leads to damage of nerve cells in specific areas of the brain.

Please find a link below that will offer you further information and support

https://www.hda.org.uk/

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

 

Korsakoff Syndrome

Korsakoff Syndrome, also known as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is a long-term memory disorder caused by severe deficiency of thiamine (vitamin B-1). Korsakoff syndrome is most commonly caused by alcohol misuse, but certain other conditions also can cause the syndrome such as diet deficiences.

Please find a link below that will offer you further information and support

https://www.youngdementiauk.org/korsakoff%E2%80%99s-syndrome

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

 

Motor Neurone Disease

Motor Neurone Disease (MND) is a rapidly progressive, fatal disease that can affect any adult at any time. The cause of MND is unknown and there is no known cure.

The degenerative neurological condition causes motor neurones in the brain and spinal cord to break down, leaving people unable to walk, talk or swallow, and yet the brain and senses usually remain unaffected so people with MND can still think and feel. Their muscles simply refuse to work.

The effects of MND can vary enormously from person to person, from the presenting symptoms, the rate and pattern of the disease progression to the length of survival time after diagnosis.

Please find a link below that will offer you further information and support

https://www.mndassociation.org/about-mnd/where-do-i-start/what-is-mnd/

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

 

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) affects nerves in the brain and spinal cord. Each nerve in the brain and spinal cord is surrounded by a layer of protein called Myelin, which protects the nerve and helps electrical signals from the brain, travel to the rest of the body. 

In MS the Myelin becomes damaged. This disrupts the transfer of these nerve signals, causing a wide range of symptoms including problems with muscle movement, balance and loss of vision. MS itself is rarely fatal, but complications may arise from severe MS, such as chest or bladder infections, or swallowing difficulties.

Please find a link below that will offer you further information and support

https://www.mssociety.org.uk/about-ms/what-is-ms

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

 

Multiple Systems Atrophy

Multiple System Atrophy is a rare nervous system disorder where nerve cells in several parts of the brain deteriorate over time.

This causes problems with balance, movement and the automatic nervous system, which controls a number of the body’s automatic functions, such as breathing and bladder control.

Symptoms of Multiple Systems Atrophy usually start when someone is between 50 and 60 years of age, but they can come at any time after 30. The symptoms are wide-ranging and include muscles control problems, similar to those of Parkinson’s Disease.

Many different functions of the body can be affected, including the urinary system, blood pressure control and muscle movement. Although there are many different possible symptoms of Multiple System Atrophy, not everyone who’s affected will have all of them.

Please find a link below that will offer you further information and support

https://www.msatrust.org.uk/

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

 

Muscular Dystrophy

The Muscular Dystrophies (MD) are a group of inherited genetic conditions that gradually cause the muscles to weaken, leading to an increasing level of disability.

MD is a progressive condition, which means it gets worse over time. It often begins by affecting a particular group of muscles, before affecting the muscles more widely. Some types of MD eventually affect the heart or the muscles used for breathing, at which point the condition becomes life-threatening.

There is no cure for MD, but treatment can help to manage many of the symptoms. There are many different types of MD, each with somewhat different symptoms. Not all types cause severe disability and many don’t affect life expectancy.

Please find a link below that will offer you further information and support

http://www.musculardystrophyuk.org/about-muscle-wasting-conditions/

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

 

Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s Disease is caused by a loss of nerve cells in the part of the brain called the Substantia Nigra. This leads to a reduction in a chemical called Dopamine in the brain. Dopamine plays a vital role in regulating the movement of the body. A reduction in Dopamine is responsible for many of the symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease.

Typical symptoms include a tremor (shaking), stiff and inflexible muscles, depression, constipation, problems sleeping (insomnia), loss of smell (anosmia) and memory problems. 

As the condition progresses, the symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease can get worse and it can become increasingly difficult to carry out everyday activities without assistance.

Please find a link below that will offer you further information and support

https://www.parkinsons.org.uk/information-and-support/what-parkinsons

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

 

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP)

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) is a neurological condition caused by the premature loss of nerve cells in certain parts of the brain.

The condition gets its name because:

Progressive – it steadily worsens over time

Supranuclear – it damages the nuclei that control eye movements

Palsy – it causes weakness

There is currently no known cure or viable medication and it generally affects people over the age of 60 but can also affect people in their 40s and 50s.

Symptoms are varied and in early stages tend to generate falls (often backwards) progressing to difficulties with speech and swallowing, vision, continence and mobility whilst the intellect generally remains intact.

Please find a link below that will offer you further information and support

https://www.pspassociation.org.uk/information-and-support/what-is-psp/brief-guide-to-psp/

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

 

Spinal Cord Injury

The spinal cord is an extension of the brain and is made up of a thick bundle of nerves. The nerves carry messages from our brain to the rest of our body. These messages help us to move our body, feel pressure and control vital functions like breathing, blood pressure, bladder and bowels. 

When the spinal cord is damaged, the communication between our brain and the rest of our body is disrupted, resulting in a loss of movement and sensation from below the level of injury. Damage to the spinal cord can be caused by a trauma like an accident, or as a result of infection or disease.

Please find a link below that will offer you further information and support

https://www.spinal.co.uk/learn/understanding-sci/

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

 

Stroke

A stroke is a brain attack; it happens when the blood supply to part of your brain is cut off. Blood carries essential nutrients and oxygen to your brain. Without blood your brain cells can be damaged or die. This damage can have different effects, depending on where it happens in your brain.

A stroke can affect the way your body works as well as how you think, feel and communicate.

As we age, our arteries become harder and narrower and more likely to become blocked. However, certain medical conditions and lifestyle factors can speed up this process and increase your risk of having a stroke.

Please find a link below that will offer you further information and support

https://www.stroke.org.uk/what-is-stroke/types-of-stroke

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

 

Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic Brain Injury, also known as intracranial injury, is an injury to the brain caused by an external force. There are many possible causes, including road traffic accidents, violence and accidents.

This can result in physical, cognitive, emotional and behavioural issues that can cause life changing consequences.

Please find a link below that will offer you further information and support

https://www.headway.org.uk/about-brain-injury/individuals/types-of-brain-injury/traumatic-brain-injury/

If you would like to speak with us for further advice or a placement enquiry please contact: 0330 20 20 305 or placements.officer@pjcare.co.uk.

Testimonials


  • This is what rehabilitation is about, caring and understanding the space to rebuild yourself.

    Mr Jules Corry

    Previous resident